shado magazine’s latest issue spotlights those at the frontline of the climate crisis

The magazine is interrogating the importance of intersectionality within the climate justice movement


Who

are shado?


See. Hear. Act. Do. In four short words you instantly know what shado (and their name) stands for. Through their online and print publication, shado has created a collective space to amplify the voices of those at the frontline of political, social, and cultural change. Run by Hannah Robathan and Izzy Pearce, they are working to change perceptions and narratives around issues faced by those at the margins of society by spotlighting people across disciplines. Let’s hear more from Hannah and Izzy on their latest issue Climate Justice.



What

is their latest issue all about?


Hannah and Izzy: “Our third issue is on the theme of Climate Justice, and we’re offering a platform for people who have historically been left out of the climate conversation. These are people who are disproportionately impacted by the physical impacts of climate change – but, in a twisted irony, it is these people who have contributed the least to the crisis yet who are impacted the most. Naturally, therefore, a majority of our pieces are authored by Black, Indigenous and People of Colour (BIPOC), and voices from the Global South.


Themes discussed in the issue include: the intersections of Black Lives Matter, COVID-19, and climate justice; eco-feminism and Indigenous activism; and youth activists challenging the whitewashing of the activist movement. We learn about why climate justice must be inclusive of disability justice and why women in Gaza face the dual oppression of gendered and environmental implications of Israeli occupation, and from many more brilliant people at the frontline of the climate crisis.”


“Our third issue is on the theme of Climate Justice, and we’re offering a platform for people who have historically been left out of the climate conversation”


Why

did they decide to focus this issue on the climate crisis?


Hannah and Izzy: “Our use of the term Climate Justice is shado's attempt to redefine the climate crisis as a social justice issue. While the Western world is slowly waking up to climate change as a threat to its existence, the rapid decline of our environment is also a site for multiple intersections of injustice – making the climate crisis a human rights issue of critical and increasing importance.


We think climate is a hot topic right now – both figuratively and literally – but that mainstream media seems to focus on Greta Thunberg, XR ‘rebels’, and not much else. So, we want this edition to spotlight the people creating change on the frontlines who are not afforded any time in Western press.


This also reflects our belief that understanding can be an antidote to violence and misrepresentation – and that those who are subject to this injustice are the ones best placed to advocate for meaningful change within this space.”



How

does shado hope this issue will ignite conversation and action?


Hannah and Izzy: “Our third issue has been a long time in the making and we believe that COVID-19 represents a crucial moment in time which has laid bare existing and systemic inequalities. This issue presents the need for better, more hopeful stories in which a just world can be imagined.


By platforming the individuals creating change and the work of a new generation of voices bringing hope to the climate justice movement, we hope to encourage positive action and and dialogue around the movement and its potential.


The voices in this collection offer a vitally different story to the one we’ve been told before so most importantly we hope to inspire people to participate in, and promote, a more inclusive and intersectional movement that places human rights for all at its core.”


“...we hope to inspire people to participate in, and promote, a more inclusive and intersectional movement that places human rights for all at its core.”

Where

can you find out more about shado?


You can buy their latest issue here and follow them on Instagram to keep up with the latest.